Posted September 14, 2013

Minnesota coach Jerry Kill carted off the field after suffering seizure

Jerry Kill, Minnesota Golden Gophers

Minnesota coach Jerry Kill was carted off the field during halftime of the Gophers’ game against Western Illinois on Saturday after suffering a seizure:

Minnesota said the coach is resting comfortably at an area hospital:

Kill has a history of epileptic seizures dating back to his days as coach at Southern Illinois. He suffered a seizure during a 2005 game against Illinois State, and he collapsed on the field during Minnesota’s game against New Mexico State in 2011. In August, he told ESPN’s Rick Reilly that he estimates he has suffered 20 seizures over the last two years.

Kill has spoken at the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota and spent time with children suffering from the condition. According to Reilly, Kill had been seeing an epilepsy specialist at the Mayo Clinic prior to this season.

12 comments
Ebullient
Ebullient

"Surreal" has to be one of the most misused words in the English language.

eliar3
eliar3

Kill has consistently stated that his seizures are manageable, albeit scary to those watching.  I used to be one who questioned his role, but the staff and student-athletes know it is a part of his life - and now a part of theirs.  They have procedures in place if/when this happens during practices and games.  If Kill, his family, and doctors, believe no further harm comes from the job of coaching, he should be allowed to do so - and evaluated on the team's performance.  If he is no longer able to do the job, or if the team is not progressing, then his position should be reevaluated.  It is obvious that his epilepsy & seizures have prevented other big-conference schools from hiring him (he develops and wins wherever he goes).  UMinn should keep him for as long as possible - he has really improved things on campus and throughout the area.

6marK6
6marK6

Wow, finally a reason to watch the Gophers play football.

henryonhillside
henryonhillside

@ITATTRACTS @TheSconnieNation Yes, so he can have seizures at home. Or in the press box where he's working as an assistant head coach. The cold hard fact is that seizures in public, in a high-profile job, in a stadium in front of tens of thousands of people, generates fear and trepidation. Those people may be ignorant, they may need to be educated about the value of tolerance, yadda yadda, but the fact remains, their day at the stadium has just been wrecked by the sight of a head coach having a seizure. That's how people are built, like it or not. I have a lot of tolerance for serious health conditions, for disabilities of all kinds, but a guy who is prone to seizures (20 in the last two years) has no business in a high-stress, high-profile job on the sideline in front of thousands of people - especially when the threat of head injuries looms constantly in the background of the event, as is the case with football.   

TheSconnieNation
TheSconnieNation

@ITATTRACTS Do we know what causes his seizures?  Stress can play a roll and their is no argument that he has a stressful job.  Family always comes first and he has the money to spend his time with them.  

TheSconnieNation
TheSconnieNation

@AGuyWithAName @ITATTRACTS Again, I'm not a doc.  Having seen the guy do this a number of times on the sidelines, I feel for his family.  I knew him when he was at NIU and really like the guy.  

TheSconnieNation
TheSconnieNation

@AGuyWithAName @ITATTRACTS I'm not a doc but "a new study reports that over a third of seizures in patients admitted to the Johns Hopkins in-patient epilepsy unit are actually psychogenic in nature, rather than epileptic. This means that the seizures were actually physical manifestations of emotional stress, and not the result of abnormal electrical activity in the brain."